Museum of London objects for Sherlock Holmes Exhibition The great detective Sherlock Holmes is a legendary London figure who has caught the public imagination and been immortalised on film by a number of outstanding actors, from Basil Rathbone to Benedict Cumberbatch. A new exhibition at the Museum of London invites visitors to investigate the life and times of Arthur Conan Doyle’s iconic creation.

Exploring the secret of the character’s enduring attraction, it examines how the stories have made the transition from page to screen and continue to appeal to today’s audiences. Early film, photography, paintings and original artefacts are used to recreate the atmosphere of Victorian London, conjuring up the days when horse-drawn carriages could be seen along the Strand. Conan Doyle wrote his first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet, in 1886, creating a detective famed for his brilliant mind and remarkable powers of deduction. Together with his companion Dr Watson,  who acts as narrator, Holmes investigates and solves baffling cases and battles with his arch enemy, Moriarty.

Holmes himself attributes his success to his skills of observation and deduction, commenting in one of his most famous cases, The Hound of the Baskervilles, that:  “The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.” The much-quoted catchphrase: “Elementary, my dear Watson” doesn’t actually appear word-for-word in the books. Holmes often calls his companion “My dear Watson” and describes the solution to a case as “elementary” (in The Crooked Man) but never uses the phrase in its entirety.

In 1939, Basil Rathbone portrayed Holmes smoking a pipe and wearing a deerstalker, an image which quickly caught on. The latest actor to take on the role is Benedict Cumberbatch, teamed with Martin Freeman as Dr Watson, in the popular BBC drama Sherlock, due to return for a one-off special and three new episodes next year. The series gives the classic tales a contemporary twist and features central London locations, including Soho, Chinatown, Trafalgar Square, Waterloo Bridge, Victoria Embankment, and Sherlock’s fictional address, 221b Baker Street, which is designated as a building of “special architectural and historical interest”. The first floor study overlooking Baker Street is maintained as it was in Victorian times, and is open to the public as a museum.  

Sherlock Holmes – The Man Who Never Lived And Will Never Die is on view at the Museum of London from 17 October 2014 – 12 April 2015 Adult £12 (£10.90 without donation) Concessions, including children aged 12-15, £10 (£9 without donation) Flexible family tickets for 3-6 people including at least one child – £9.50 per person (£8.50 per person without donation)

Among special events taking place at the Museum of London to tie in with the exhibition are:

In conversation with Anthony Horowitz  The author discusses his newly released book, Moriarty, with Professor of Victorian Literature and Culture, Clare Pettitt, and Chief Curator of the Sherlock exhibition, Alex Werner. The event on Monday 27 October is followed by a book signing. Advance booking required – price £10.

[Museum of London objects for Sherlock Holmes Exhibition The great detective Sherlock Holmes is a legendary London figure who has caught the public imagination and been immortalised on film by a number of outstanding actors, from Basil Rathbone to Benedict Cumberbatch. A new exhibition at the Museum of London invites visitors to investigate the life and times of Arthur Conan Doyle’s iconic creation.

Exploring the secret of the character’s enduring attraction, it examines how the stories have made the transition from page to screen and continue to appeal to today’s audiences. Early film, photography, paintings and original artefacts are used to recreate the atmosphere of Victorian London, conjuring up the days when horse-drawn carriages could be seen along the Strand. Conan Doyle wrote his first Sherlock Holmes story, A Study in Scarlet, in 1886, creating a detective famed for his brilliant mind and remarkable powers of deduction. Together with his companion Dr Watson,  who acts as narrator, Holmes investigates and solves baffling cases and battles with his arch enemy, Moriarty.

Holmes himself attributes his success to his skills of observation and deduction, commenting in one of his most famous cases, The Hound of the Baskervilles, that:  “The world is full of obvious things which nobody by any chance ever observes.” The much-quoted catchphrase: “Elementary, my dear Watson” doesn’t actually appear word-for-word in the books. Holmes often calls his companion “My dear Watson” and describes the solution to a case as “elementary” (in The Crooked Man) but never uses the phrase in its entirety.

In 1939, Basil Rathbone portrayed Holmes smoking a pipe and wearing a deerstalker, an image which quickly caught on. The latest actor to take on the role is Benedict Cumberbatch, teamed with Martin Freeman as Dr Watson, in the popular BBC drama Sherlock, due to return for a one-off special and three new episodes next year. The series gives the classic tales a contemporary twist and features central London locations, including Soho, Chinatown, Trafalgar Square, Waterloo Bridge, Victoria Embankment, and Sherlock’s fictional address, 221b Baker Street, which is designated as a building of “special architectural and historical interest”. The first floor study overlooking Baker Street is maintained as it was in Victorian times, and is open to the public as a museum.  

Sherlock Holmes – The Man Who Never Lived And Will Never Die is on view at the Museum of London from 17 October 2014 – 12 April 2015 Adult £12 (£10.90 without donation) Concessions, including children aged 12-15, £10 (£9 without donation) Flexible family tickets for 3-6 people including at least one child – £9.50 per person (£8.50 per person without donation)

Among special events taking place at the Museum of London to tie in with the exhibition are:

In conversation with Anthony Horowitz  The author discusses his newly released book, Moriarty, with Professor of Victorian Literature and Culture, Clare Pettitt, and Chief Curator of the Sherlock exhibition, Alex Werner. The event on Monday 27 October is followed by a book signing. Advance booking required – price £10.

](http://www.museumoflondon.org.uk/london-wall/whats-on/adult-events/late-events/ "Late London: Sherlock's City")  A chance to enter the mind of the consulting detective and experience his unique pursuits and habits through installations, live performances and workshops. Friday 21 November from 7-10pm. Advance booking £12 or combine with exhibition entry for £18.

Archaeological Mysteries Discover your inner Sherlock and find out how archaeologists piece together London’s buried mysteries on an interactive tour of the Archaeological Archive. This event takes place at  Mortimer Wheeler House. Book in advance £7.50

Find out more fascinating facts about London History on a Quirky London Tour