###### > Tour Blog > Future of Music Listening

Here’s the second part of our exploration of the future of music listening at the Protein Forum in East London.

CONNECTION

‘I wasn’t really connecting with music anymore’ says James Thirkettle, creator of the music blog, Just Press Play. ‘I had 30,000 tunes in my iTunes which I was never going to listen to. We give something new about twenty seconds before we click on the next thing in the mad dash to know EVERYTHING”.

Future of Music Listening, Trends, East London, Protein, Walking Tours

Aaaaaaaggggghhhh (pic from Neil McCormick)

He plays some video clips that offer old-fashioned solutions; the anti-playlist.

LIVING TO MUSIC

At 9pm on the first Sunday of every month Greg Wilson invites people to all listen to the same album in its entirety uninterrupted. Once the album is complete there is a forum and people can comment. The name comes from a Seattle music zine from the 60s about the way the youth listened to music – and that was to lock yourself away in a room… and listen.

**[###### ###### > Tour Blog > Future of Music Listening

Here’s the second part of our exploration of the future of music listening at the Protein Forum in East London.

CONNECTION

‘I wasn’t really connecting with music anymore’ says James Thirkettle, creator of the music blog, Just Press Play. ‘I had 30,000 tunes in my iTunes which I was never going to listen to. We give something new about twenty seconds before we click on the next thing in the mad dash to know EVERYTHING”.

Future of Music Listening, Trends, East London, Protein, Walking Tours

Aaaaaaaggggghhhh (pic from Neil McCormick)

He plays some video clips that offer old-fashioned solutions; the anti-playlist.

LIVING TO MUSIC

At 9pm on the first Sunday of every month Greg Wilson invites people to all listen to the same album in its entirety uninterrupted. Once the album is complete there is a forum and people can comment. The name comes from a Seattle music zine from the 60s about the way the youth listened to music – and that was to lock yourself away in a room… and listen.

](http://classicalbumsundays.com/ "Classic Album Sundays") does the same – and asks that you listen to the music on a decent system.

Thirkettle comments that we have these intense music experiences from childhood but we just don’t listen like that anymore. This thought immediately brings to mind me and my mates in my room staring out a skylight circa 1996 listening to Leftfield’s Leftism.

What’s heartening is that there are bands out there making albums that demand that type of listening experience, the album as journey. (See Goat & **[###### ###### > Tour Blog > Future of Music Listening

Here’s the second part of our exploration of the future of music listening at the Protein Forum in East London.

CONNECTION

‘I wasn’t really connecting with music anymore’ says James Thirkettle, creator of the music blog, Just Press Play. ‘I had 30,000 tunes in my iTunes which I was never going to listen to. We give something new about twenty seconds before we click on the next thing in the mad dash to know EVERYTHING”.

Future of Music Listening, Trends, East London, Protein, Walking Tours

Aaaaaaaggggghhhh (pic from Neil McCormick)

He plays some video clips that offer old-fashioned solutions; the anti-playlist.

LIVING TO MUSIC

At 9pm on the first Sunday of every month Greg Wilson invites people to all listen to the same album in its entirety uninterrupted. Once the album is complete there is a forum and people can comment. The name comes from a Seattle music zine from the 60s about the way the youth listened to music – and that was to lock yourself away in a room… and listen.

**[###### ###### > Tour Blog > Future of Music Listening

Here’s the second part of our exploration of the future of music listening at the Protein Forum in East London.

CONNECTION

‘I wasn’t really connecting with music anymore’ says James Thirkettle, creator of the music blog, Just Press Play. ‘I had 30,000 tunes in my iTunes which I was never going to listen to. We give something new about twenty seconds before we click on the next thing in the mad dash to know EVERYTHING”.

Future of Music Listening, Trends, East London, Protein, Walking Tours

Aaaaaaaggggghhhh (pic from Neil McCormick)

He plays some video clips that offer old-fashioned solutions; the anti-playlist.

LIVING TO MUSIC

At 9pm on the first Sunday of every month Greg Wilson invites people to all listen to the same album in its entirety uninterrupted. Once the album is complete there is a forum and people can comment. The name comes from a Seattle music zine from the 60s about the way the youth listened to music – and that was to lock yourself away in a room… and listen.

](http://classicalbumsundays.com/ "Classic Album Sundays") does the same – and asks that you listen to the music on a decent system.

Thirkettle comments that we have these intense music experiences from childhood but we just don’t listen like that anymore. This thought immediately brings to mind me and my mates in my room staring out a skylight circa 1996 listening to Leftfield’s Leftism.

What’s heartening is that there are bands out there making albums that demand that type of listening experience, the album as journey. (See Goat & ](http://sunwolfuk.bandcamp.com/ "Sunwolf") to name just two). The hard thing is finding them.

THE ROLE OF CURATION

‘The independent record shop used to be incredibly hostile’, says Alex Robinson of The Other Hand / Stones Throw.

There are knowing laughs all round.

‘Now, music blogs are the indy record shops’.

It’s all about collating. And trusting the collator.

‘Spotify is ever changing. Soon there will be artist’s pages you can follow, and therefore listen to who they’re listening to. There’s WHYD, Mixcloud’.

‘Word of mouth will always be the way’ agrees Thirkettle.

Future of Music Listening, trends, East London, Protein, Walking Tours

Spread The Word! (pic from currentphotographer.com)

MAKING MONEY

A nameless man in the crowd, who happens to work for YouTube and is the first to moot the curation theme, mentions the role of technology companies.

UKF is basically a marketing vehicle’, he says. They own no rights, but host myriad new acts. They make the money – the artists get exposure’.****

Lexxx agrees. ‘Tech companies make money but they are only as good as their content. Also, if they find something else that will make them money, they’ll just do that”.

THE FUTURE OF LISTENING

YouTube man asks – ‘What would you have been saying 20 years ago and what do you say now?’

‘Well, no-one thought digital would take off’ says Robinson. ‘And from my own perspective, labels shouldn’t be fixated on one format. You have to be the conduit between artist and listener. The key thing is that labels have an identity so the music fan knows they can trust your output’.

With Beck’s new album available only in sheetform and Bronze Format meaning that you will never hear the same version of the song twice, there does seem to be a slight movement away from the static incarnation of a track. But as a music lover myself, nothing will ever take away from the definitive version of an album or song. So the conclusion seems to be – who really knows? It’s likely to be as varied as it is now. But I certainly hope more people start to approach listening as a primary activity, not something to merely use when travelling somewhere or washing the dishes.