It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by](http://www.archizip.com/) was the launch piece, first gracing King’s Cross in 2013 in the form of a giant birdcage. This interactive art encourages exploration, as passers-by are able to walk through, and even swing on the seat at the centre. It was created to draw eyes, encourage opinions and start conversations. By day, it’s a family-friendly exploration piece. By night it takes to the skies with an illuminate display of brilliant colours, hoisted into the air to celebrate special occasions.

 
RELAY Kings Cross
image via kingscross.co.uk

From high in the skies to down below the ground, the art scene expands with The Tunnel.

Those set on exploration can take a trip down the rabbit hole (or more literally, down the escalator at One Pancras Square) to find an LED wonderland hidden beneath the city streets.

A 90m pedestrian tunnel has been transformed from a walkway to a work of art, with four distinct sections each with its own conceptual idea. The canopy, fin and floor are detailed with repeated patterns on ceramic tiles, each carefully crafted to guide the eye through to the focus piece: the light wall.

Ignited with integrated LEDs, the wall was designed by Speirs + Major, with technical delivery by The Light Lab. A full spectrum of brilliant rays creates a moving light show on the walls, inspired by the bustle of King’s Cross. Colourful, tranquil yet animated, it encapsulates the city spirit.

Kings Cross Tunnel

 image via kingscross.co.uk

Close by, illustrator [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by](http://www.archizip.com/) was the launch piece, first gracing King’s Cross in 2013 in the form of a giant birdcage. This interactive art encourages exploration, as passers-by are able to walk through, and even swing on the seat at the centre. It was created to draw eyes, encourage opinions and start conversations. By day, it’s a family-friendly exploration piece. By night it takes to the skies with an illuminate display of brilliant colours, hoisted into the air to celebrate special occasions.

 
RELAY Kings Cross
image via kingscross.co.uk

From high in the skies to down below the ground, the art scene expands with The Tunnel.

Those set on exploration can take a trip down the rabbit hole (or more literally, down the escalator at One Pancras Square) to find an LED wonderland hidden beneath the city streets.

A 90m pedestrian tunnel has been transformed from a walkway to a work of art, with four distinct sections each with its own conceptual idea. The canopy, fin and floor are detailed with repeated patterns on ceramic tiles, each carefully crafted to guide the eye through to the focus piece: the light wall.

Ignited with integrated LEDs, the wall was designed by Speirs + Major, with technical delivery by The Light Lab. A full spectrum of brilliant rays creates a moving light show on the walls, inspired by the bustle of King’s Cross. Colourful, tranquil yet animated, it encapsulates the city spirit.

Kings Cross Tunnel

 image via kingscross.co.uk

Close by, illustrator](http://www.gregorisaavedra.com/) offers his own interpretation of the area with his [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by](http://www.archizip.com/) was the launch piece, first gracing King’s Cross in 2013 in the form of a giant birdcage. This interactive art encourages exploration, as passers-by are able to walk through, and even swing on the seat at the centre. It was created to draw eyes, encourage opinions and start conversations. By day, it’s a family-friendly exploration piece. By night it takes to the skies with an illuminate display of brilliant colours, hoisted into the air to celebrate special occasions.

 
RELAY Kings Cross
image via kingscross.co.uk

From high in the skies to down below the ground, the art scene expands with The Tunnel.

Those set on exploration can take a trip down the rabbit hole (or more literally, down the escalator at One Pancras Square) to find an LED wonderland hidden beneath the city streets.

A 90m pedestrian tunnel has been transformed from a walkway to a work of art, with four distinct sections each with its own conceptual idea. The canopy, fin and floor are detailed with repeated patterns on ceramic tiles, each carefully crafted to guide the eye through to the focus piece: the light wall.

Ignited with integrated LEDs, the wall was designed by Speirs + Major, with technical delivery by The Light Lab. A full spectrum of brilliant rays creates a moving light show on the walls, inspired by the bustle of King’s Cross. Colourful, tranquil yet animated, it encapsulates the city spirit.

Kings Cross Tunnel

 image via kingscross.co.uk

Close by, illustrator [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by](http://www.archizip.com/) was the launch piece, first gracing King’s Cross in 2013 in the form of a giant birdcage. This interactive art encourages exploration, as passers-by are able to walk through, and even swing on the seat at the centre. It was created to draw eyes, encourage opinions and start conversations. By day, it’s a family-friendly exploration piece. By night it takes to the skies with an illuminate display of brilliant colours, hoisted into the air to celebrate special occasions.

 
RELAY Kings Cross
image via kingscross.co.uk

From high in the skies to down below the ground, the art scene expands with The Tunnel.

Those set on exploration can take a trip down the rabbit hole (or more literally, down the escalator at One Pancras Square) to find an LED wonderland hidden beneath the city streets.

A 90m pedestrian tunnel has been transformed from a walkway to a work of art, with four distinct sections each with its own conceptual idea. The canopy, fin and floor are detailed with repeated patterns on ceramic tiles, each carefully crafted to guide the eye through to the focus piece: the light wall.

Ignited with integrated LEDs, the wall was designed by Speirs + Major, with technical delivery by The Light Lab. A full spectrum of brilliant rays creates a moving light show on the walls, inspired by the bustle of King’s Cross. Colourful, tranquil yet animated, it encapsulates the city spirit.

Kings Cross Tunnel

 image via kingscross.co.uk

Close by, illustrator](http://www.gregorisaavedra.com/) offers his own interpretation of the area with his](http://www.kingscross.co.uk/kxmural) – using a digital collage technique to create a giant mural. Taking inspiration from the way Londoners make up their city, he brings together individual pieces to create a bigger picture.

His mural portrays the transformation of the area – perfectly reflecting what’s behind the wall.

The German Gymnasium is being renovated by D&D London. A complex of restaurants complete with bar and terraces will soon bring the buzz back to the street.

Gregori’s work is inspired by possibility, aiming to show all that King’s Cross could soon offer. Depicting new landmarks, local events, the site and the people enjoying the spaces, he’s captured a city on the brink of change, and used the buzz surrounding the regeneration to bring his art to life.

Kings Cross Mural

image via kingscross.co.uk

And for those looking to get involved with the art, the literary treasure hunt created by the [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by](http://www.archizip.com/) was the launch piece, first gracing King’s Cross in 2013 in the form of a giant birdcage. This interactive art encourages exploration, as passers-by are able to walk through, and even swing on the seat at the centre. It was created to draw eyes, encourage opinions and start conversations. By day, it’s a family-friendly exploration piece. By night it takes to the skies with an illuminate display of brilliant colours, hoisted into the air to celebrate special occasions.

 
RELAY Kings Cross
image via kingscross.co.uk

From high in the skies to down below the ground, the art scene expands with The Tunnel.

Those set on exploration can take a trip down the rabbit hole (or more literally, down the escalator at One Pancras Square) to find an LED wonderland hidden beneath the city streets.

A 90m pedestrian tunnel has been transformed from a walkway to a work of art, with four distinct sections each with its own conceptual idea. The canopy, fin and floor are detailed with repeated patterns on ceramic tiles, each carefully crafted to guide the eye through to the focus piece: the light wall.

Ignited with integrated LEDs, the wall was designed by Speirs + Major, with technical delivery by The Light Lab. A full spectrum of brilliant rays creates a moving light show on the walls, inspired by the bustle of King’s Cross. Colourful, tranquil yet animated, it encapsulates the city spirit.

Kings Cross Tunnel

 image via kingscross.co.uk

Close by, illustrator [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by](http://www.archizip.com/) was the launch piece, first gracing King’s Cross in 2013 in the form of a giant birdcage. This interactive art encourages exploration, as passers-by are able to walk through, and even swing on the seat at the centre. It was created to draw eyes, encourage opinions and start conversations. By day, it’s a family-friendly exploration piece. By night it takes to the skies with an illuminate display of brilliant colours, hoisted into the air to celebrate special occasions.

 
RELAY Kings Cross
image via kingscross.co.uk

From high in the skies to down below the ground, the art scene expands with The Tunnel.

Those set on exploration can take a trip down the rabbit hole (or more literally, down the escalator at One Pancras Square) to find an LED wonderland hidden beneath the city streets.

A 90m pedestrian tunnel has been transformed from a walkway to a work of art, with four distinct sections each with its own conceptual idea. The canopy, fin and floor are detailed with repeated patterns on ceramic tiles, each carefully crafted to guide the eye through to the focus piece: the light wall.

Ignited with integrated LEDs, the wall was designed by Speirs + Major, with technical delivery by The Light Lab. A full spectrum of brilliant rays creates a moving light show on the walls, inspired by the bustle of King’s Cross. Colourful, tranquil yet animated, it encapsulates the city spirit.

Kings Cross Tunnel

 image via kingscross.co.uk

Close by, illustrator](http://www.gregorisaavedra.com/) offers his own interpretation of the area with his [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by](http://www.archizip.com/) was the launch piece, first gracing King’s Cross in 2013 in the form of a giant birdcage. This interactive art encourages exploration, as passers-by are able to walk through, and even swing on the seat at the centre. It was created to draw eyes, encourage opinions and start conversations. By day, it’s a family-friendly exploration piece. By night it takes to the skies with an illuminate display of brilliant colours, hoisted into the air to celebrate special occasions.

 
RELAY Kings Cross
image via kingscross.co.uk

From high in the skies to down below the ground, the art scene expands with The Tunnel.

Those set on exploration can take a trip down the rabbit hole (or more literally, down the escalator at One Pancras Square) to find an LED wonderland hidden beneath the city streets.

A 90m pedestrian tunnel has been transformed from a walkway to a work of art, with four distinct sections each with its own conceptual idea. The canopy, fin and floor are detailed with repeated patterns on ceramic tiles, each carefully crafted to guide the eye through to the focus piece: the light wall.

Ignited with integrated LEDs, the wall was designed by Speirs + Major, with technical delivery by The Light Lab. A full spectrum of brilliant rays creates a moving light show on the walls, inspired by the bustle of King’s Cross. Colourful, tranquil yet animated, it encapsulates the city spirit.

Kings Cross Tunnel

 image via kingscross.co.uk

Close by, illustrator [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by [It’s tough to find time to stop and smell the roses in a city dictated by train times, but the art scene in King’s Cross has come into bloom. As busy crowds rush across platforms, these installations are stopping commuters in their tracks.

With the regeneration of King’s Cross comes RELAY – the area’s first dedicated arts program. Exploring the idea of the human chain and working to the theme of transportation and progression, each of their artworks highlights an area of the emerging cityscape.

IFO (Identified Flying Object) by](http://www.archizip.com/) was the launch piece, first gracing King’s Cross in 2013 in the form of a giant birdcage. This interactive art encourages exploration, as passers-by are able to walk through, and even swing on the seat at the centre. It was created to draw eyes, encourage opinions and start conversations. By day, it’s a family-friendly exploration piece. By night it takes to the skies with an illuminate display of brilliant colours, hoisted into the air to celebrate special occasions.

 
RELAY Kings Cross
image via kingscross.co.uk

From high in the skies to down below the ground, the art scene expands with The Tunnel.

Those set on exploration can take a trip down the rabbit hole (or more literally, down the escalator at One Pancras Square) to find an LED wonderland hidden beneath the city streets.

A 90m pedestrian tunnel has been transformed from a walkway to a work of art, with four distinct sections each with its own conceptual idea. The canopy, fin and floor are detailed with repeated patterns on ceramic tiles, each carefully crafted to guide the eye through to the focus piece: the light wall.

Ignited with integrated LEDs, the wall was designed by Speirs + Major, with technical delivery by The Light Lab. A full spectrum of brilliant rays creates a moving light show on the walls, inspired by the bustle of King’s Cross. Colourful, tranquil yet animated, it encapsulates the city spirit.

Kings Cross Tunnel

 image via kingscross.co.uk

Close by, illustrator](http://www.gregorisaavedra.com/) offers his own interpretation of the area with his](http://www.kingscross.co.uk/kxmural) – using a digital collage technique to create a giant mural. Taking inspiration from the way Londoners make up their city, he brings together individual pieces to create a bigger picture.

His mural portrays the transformation of the area – perfectly reflecting what’s behind the wall.

The German Gymnasium is being renovated by D&D London. A complex of restaurants complete with bar and terraces will soon bring the buzz back to the street.

Gregori’s work is inspired by possibility, aiming to show all that King’s Cross could soon offer. Depicting new landmarks, local events, the site and the people enjoying the spaces, he’s captured a city on the brink of change, and used the buzz surrounding the regeneration to bring his art to life.

Kings Cross Mural

image via kingscross.co.uk

And for those looking to get involved with the art, the literary treasure hunt created by the](https://www.clpe.org.uk/) offers interactive fun for all the family.

Scattered around Granary Square passages about nature – both fact and fictional – lay hidden, awaiting their discovery. Designed to engage kids in reading and writing, there are verses about dragons, snippets about seasons and lines about nature, animals and craftsmen all awaiting an audience.

Starting at the visitor’s centre, families can pick up instructions and a map and set off on the Poetry Trail in search of their own sonnet.

Kings Cross Poetry Trail

image via kingscross.co.uk

Explore more of the city’s art and find out what else the regeneration will bring with our King’s Cross Regeneration Tour. Alternately, satiate your inner art-seeker with our Street Art Tour.